3 Tools for Leveraging Employees in Social Media Marketing

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Theoretically, one way to boost your social media presence is to get employees involved.  I say “theoretically” because I’ve heard a good measure of fear and loathing from business owners around their employees’ use of Facebook, etc.  And rightly so – we’ve all heard the horror stories of employees who’ve blasted out absolutely the wrong thing on Facebook, damaging the firm and getting fired.

But the reality is that most of your employees are probably already on Facebook or some other social media site.  And yes, they may be talking about you.  So it makes sense to give employees some guidelines up front and encourage positive posting which helps, rather than hurts, your business.

Here are three tools which I’ve come across lately, which can help you leverage your employees in the social media sphere:

  1. Develop social media guidelines: It’s important that you and your employees are clear on what types of work-related posts are appropriate and encouraged.  TNT has made their social media guidelines available on Scribd and they make a nice template for businesses of all sizes.
  2. Create a social media culture:  Handing employees a social policy statement at the date of hiring is not enough.  They won’t read it or will forget it if they do.  -Big and small companies alike have to develop a social media culture.  How?  Start with people in your company who get it (the low-hanging fruit approach) and champion them like mad.  For more info, check out this article, which is written more for corporate types but… oh, you’ll get the picture.
  3. Use employees to generate blog content:  If you’re having trouble coming up with new and relevant content for your website, join the club.  But your employees are probably having all sorts of great customer interactions and business experiences that you can leverage.  Here’s a simple template from Content Rules for developing blog posts.  And, hey, you can always edit the blog entries before they’re posted.
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